CURRICULUM VITAE

Alan M. Immerman, D.C.

 

PERSONAL

 

Contact:        Alan M. Immerman, D.C.

3515 East Carol Avenue Phoenix, AZ 85028

Office 602.368.9496

Fax 602.962.8113.

Email: aimmerman1@cox.net

Arizona Chiropractic Society Webpage: www.AZChiropractors.org

 

EDUCATION

 

  • Doctorate of Chiropractic, National College of Chiropractic, Lombard, IL 1980, now the National University of Health Sciences
  • B.S. Human Biology, National College of Chiropractic, Lombard, IL 1980, now the National University of Health Sciences
  • B.S. Chemistry, Northern Arizona University, 1977

 

HONORS

 

  • Magna Cum Laude, Northern Arizona University, 1977
  • Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society, 1977
  • Honor Roll and Dean’s List multiple semesters, Northern Arizona University, 1977-1980
  • Diplomat, National Board of Chiropractic Examiners, 1980
  • National Dean’s List, 1980
  • Listed in “Who’s Who in Health Care,” Supplement to The Business Journal, 12/10/90
  • Arizona Chiropractor of the Year Award, Arizona Chiropractic Alliance (AzCA), 1991
  • Listed in “Who’s Who in Arizona Business,” Supplement to The Business Journal, 08/05/91
  • Arizona Meritorious Award, Arizona Association of Chiropractic (AAC), 1994
  • Arizona Chiropractor of the Year Award, Arizona Chiropractic Society (ACS), 2000 (formerly Independent Chiropractic Physicians)

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

 

  • 2009 to Current: Post-Graduate Faculty Instructor, Parker College of Chiropractic, course title “Clinical Biomechanics of Whiplash Injuries.” Subjects in course include:

 

  1. Human volunteer whiplash testing performed to date and conclusions that may be made from such testing.
  2. Is it possible to calculate the amount of force applied to a vehicle or an individual and then predict injury likelihood or severity from that figure alone? Must other factors be considered? If so, what other factors?
  3. Of what value are probability predictions in the face of actual medical records which document an injury?
  4. How to use the IIHS to evaluate vehicle head restraints for ability to protect neck from injury in rear-end impacts.
  5. Latest information about cervical and lumbar injury mechanisms following rear-end impacts with specific references to the literature.
  6. The appropriateness of so-called “comparable activities” analyses such as amusement park bumper car rides.
  7. General comments on Delta V: What is it? Are there any general errors in reporting?
  8. Overall conclusions of the chiropractic clinical biomechanist.
  9. Comprehensive bibliography from the peer-reviewed literature.

 

  • 1980 to 2000: Private Practice of Chiropractic
  • 1994 to 1977: Chiropractic Practice with Neil Chloupek, M.D. Provided chiropractic services to Dr. Chloupek’s patients.
  • 1991 to 2004: Owned and operated Independent Chiropractic Physicians, Inc., a chiropractic independent physician association. Lobbied legislature on behalf

of organization.

  • 2004 to Current: Serve as President and Executive Director of the Arizona Chiropractic Society, a non-profit state chiropractic association.
  • 1991 to 2000: Owned and operated Northern Arizona Center for Sports Medicine and Spinal Rehabilitation, worked with Darrell Parry, D.O.
  • 1991 to 1993: Clinic Administrator, Mesa Physical Rehabilitation. Medical Director was John Porter, M.D.
  • 1989 to 1990: Postgraduate Faculty Instructor, National College of Chiropractic, Nutrition.
  • 1997 to 1998: Partner with William Zachow, D.O. in a medical and chiropractic clinic in Phoenix.
  • 1998 to 2000: Affiliated with Desert Sun Urgent Care in Chandler managing chiropractic practice with Walter Van Helder, M.D. and Steve Yeager, D.C.
  • 1997 to Current: Retained as an expert and written forensic reports in more than 700 legal matters, qualified to testify in more than 72 trials in Maricopa, Pima, Mohave and Coconino County Superior Courts as a legal expert in chiropractic, clinical biomechanics of whiplash injuries, and accident reconstruction

 

POSTGRADUATE EDUCATION

 

  • “Impairment Rating,” Colorado Springs, CO, Parker College of Chiropractic, 1985
  • “Evaluating the Chiropractic Claim,” Las Vegas, Nevada, 40 hours, 1990
  • “Spine and Strength Symposium,” San Diego, California, 12 hours, 1992
  • “Applied Spinal Disability Evaluation,” Phoenix, AZ, Parker College of Chiropractic, 12 hours, 1998
  • “Collision Reconstruction for the Medical Professional,” Texas A & M University, 40 hours, 1999. This course taught the following subjects:
    • Basic equations used in collision analysis
    • The nature of motor vehicle energy absorption systems
    • The ability to find information on motor vehicles and their susceptibility to damage in low speed collisions
    • The ability to calculate Delta V in low speed collisions
    • An understanding of occupant motion and tolerances to various low speed impacts
    • An understanding of the appropriateness of comparisons made between everyday so-called “comparable” activities and occupant kinetics and kinematics in low speed collisions

 

Additional post-graduate courses include:

  • “Current Topics in Whiplash Research,” Life Chiropractic College, 12 hours, 2000
  • “The Role of Human, Vehicle and Environmental Factors in Traffic Accident Cases: From Reconstruction through Litigation”, Lawyers & Judges Publishing Company, Inc. of Tucson, AZ, Scottsdale, AZ. Instructors included Alan J. Watts, Ph.D., 12 hour program, 2000.
  • “Chiropractic for the 21st Century”, Palmer College of Chiropractic, 12 hours, 2001.

2002 to Current: Twelve hours per year of continuing education in biomechanics, orthopedics, chiropractic and other related subjects in compliance with Arizona state law. Here is a partial list of courses:

  • University of Bridgeport Chiropractic College Physical Therapy 102, 2002:
    • Describe ideal pad placement for interferential therapy
    • Discuss increasing muscle strength in the elderly
    • Construct screening procedures and treatment for the TMJ
    • Relate the evaluation and treatment of whiplash
    • Review rehabilitation of ankle injuries
    • University of Bridgeport Chiropractic College Ortho 103: Normal Cervical Biomechanics: Considerations Toward Examination, 2002
    • University of Bridgeport Chiropractic College Ortho 105: Introduction to the Clinical Biomechanics of Stability, 2002
    • University of Bridgeport Chiropractic College Ortho 103: Headache Associated with Musculoskeletal Symptoms, 2003

University of Bridgeport Chiropractic College, 2004:

  • Rehab 103: Long-term Course of Low Back Pain
  • Ortho 109: Anticipatory Neck Control Reduced With Pain
  • Ortho 110: Injury Biomechanics Defined With Terminology, Biomechanical Properties of Ligaments and Tendons, Muscle, Articular Cartilage and Peripheral Nerves

Biomechanics encompasses a wide array of fields as they relate to musculoskeletal conditions. Very simply, biomechanics utilizes the laws of physics and engineering to describe motions and forces acting on anatomical structures. So what exactly is injury biomechanics? It’s the

application of engineering principles to the understanding of how the body is injured. And why should chiropractors be concerned with physics and engineering terms? On a daily basis in clinical practice we are asked to diagnose and treat traumatic injuries of both acute and chronic nature. In order to differentiate tissue involvement and arrive at an accurate diagnostic impression, we must understand injury mechanisms and causation. The majority of physicians whether they are DC’s, MD’s or DO’s, have not been trained in mechanisms of injury. Since the majority of our patients present with musculoskeletal complaints, it behooves us to acquire knowledge on how and why these injuries have arisen.

  • Ortho 101: Strength Training and Postural Control, Manual Therapy in Whiplash-Associated Disorders, Orientation of the Cervical Facet Joints
  • Research Trends 102: Chronic spine pain and spinal manipulation, Neurophysiology of spinal manipulation: Part I and Part II, Spinal manipulation and exercise for neck pain

University of Bridgeport Chiropractic College, 2006: Soft Tissue Injuries 101: Soft Tissue Injuries, The Neglected Cause of Musculoskeletal Disorders, 12 hours

  • Explain the anatomy and functionality of healthy soft tissue components
  • Explain the effects of injury on soft tissue
  • Define effects of injured soft tissue on functionality of the spine and extremities
  • Discuss patterns of musculoskeletal relationships of recruiting other structures after injury and their effects on functionality

University of Bridgeport Chiropractic College, 2009:

  • Soft Tissue Injuries 103: Introduction to Soft Tissue Injuries
    • Explain the types of soft tissue
    • Demonstrate and discuss diagnostic evaluation of soft tissue injury
    • Explain pain patterns of neurological injury for differential diagnosis
    • Discuss types of soft tissue injuries
    • Evaluate soft tissue changes associated with pain
    • Discuss the mechanisms of healing soft tissue injuries
    • Describe diagnostic tools in determining soft tissue injuries
    • Explain the use of ice and heat in soft tissue injuries
    • Demonstrate and discuss stretching; passive, active and postfacilitation
    • Demonstrate and discuss somatic technique
    • Demonstrate and discuss strain/counterstrain
    • Demonstrate and discuss friction massage
    • Demonstrate and discuss Postisometric relaxation
    • Demonstrate and discuss electrical muscle stimulation and ultrasound
    • Demonstrate and discuss trigger point ultrasound in treatment
    • Discuss massage therapy
    • Demonstrate and discuss myofascial release
    • Demonstrate and discuss active release
    • Demonstrate and discuss Neuromuscular Therapy (NMT)
    • Discuss cold laser therapy
    • Demonstrate and discuss exercise rehabilitation and muscle strengthening
    • Discuss mobilization and manipulation
    • Soft Tissue Injuries 106: Soft Tissue Injuries Cervical Spine
      • Explain the structural anatomy of the bones and joints of the cervical spine, ligaments and muscles of the cervical spine and the nerves, blood vessels and fascia of the cervical spine
      • Explain the functional anatomy of the bones and joints of the cervical spine, the ligaments and muscles of the cervical spine and the nerves, blood vessels and fascia of the cervical spine
      • Demonstrate the passive examination of the bones and joints of the cervical spine, the ligaments and muscles of the cervical spine and the nerves, blood vessels and fascia of the cervical spine
      • Demonstrate the active examination of the bones and joints of the cervical spine, the ligaments and muscles of the cervical spine and the nerves, blood vessels and fascia of the cervical spine
      • Discuss imaging of the cervical spine
      • Discuss advanced testing of the soft tissue of the cervical spine
      • Describe pathological conditions of the bony structures, joints, ligaments, tendons, muscles, nerves, blood vessels and fascia of the cervical spine
      • Explain the mechanism of acceleration/deceleration impact
      • Explain the effects on the cervical spine from acceleration/deceleration injury, and specifically the effects on the soft tissues structures
      • Explain the grading system for acceleration/deceleration injury
      • Demonstrate soft tissue treatments for the pathological conditions of the bony structures, joints, ligaments, tendons, muscles, blood vessels, nerves and fascia of the cervical spine
      • Demonstrate soft tissue treatments for the sequela of acceleration/deceleration injury
      • Define relationships of the cervical spine with other regions
      • Ortho 115: Waddell Signs: Is it “Real” or Biopsychosocial?
      • Pain 101: Concepts in Chronic Pain Management

Texas Chiropractic College, 12 Hour Chiropractic Treatment of Auto Accident Injuries, 2010:

  • Biomechanics Of Cervical Acceleration / Deceleration; Injury Diagnosis, Pathology and Physiology of Auto Related Injuries; Evaluation And Management Of Head Trauma and Spinal Injuries; and Auto Injury Diagnostic Testing Procedures

Texas Chiropractic College, 12 Hour Chiropractic Treatment of Auto Accident Injuries, 2011:

  • Biomechanics Of Cervical Acceleration / Deceleration; Injury Diagnosis, Pathology and Physiology of Auto Related Injuries; Evaluation And Management Of Head Trauma and Spinal Injuries; and Auto Injury Diagnostic Testing Procedures

University of Bridgeport Chiropractic College, 2012

Documentation 153 Documenting Bodily/Personal Injury Cases

  • Develop the skills for medical documentation record-keeping for proper patient care and adherence to insurance value based parameters
  • Recognize the importance, and benefits of thorough chart documentation from the standpoint of the patient, the provider, the profession and third-party payors
  • Show how outcome assessment documentation benefits the patient, the provider, the profession, and third-party payors
  • Demonstrate physical examination procedures that are the basis for diagnosis formulation and value based data
  • Examine skills necessary to incorporate an outcomes-based, evidenced-influenced approach to patient-centered health care in bodily injuries

Pain 102 Concepts in Chronic Pain Management Part II

  • Discuss the changing concepts of pain relief for chronic pain patients
  • Discuss the newer ideas regarding the use of opioids in pain management
  • Discuss the importance of adjunctive medication in assisting chronic pain cases
  • Describe the concept of PCA
  • Review the different narcotics available
  • Describe the WHO Pain Ladder

Pain 103 Concepts in Chronic Pain Management Part III

  • List 5 different non-pharmacological modalities
    • Discuss why D phenylalanine is important conceptually in regard to pain
    • Describe what tolerance is as it relates to pain
    • Describe what addiction is as it related to pain
    • Discuss relaxation methods as it relates to pain

Pain 104 Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Pain Management

  • Extrapolate the use of Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAMS) for Pain Management as it pertains to prevalence of use, safety and cost
  • Discuss the Epidemiology of Pain
  • Assess pain in patients
  • Classify pain by extrapolating the physiology and biochemistry of pain
  • Compare the sensation, attention and behavioral aspects of pain
  • Recognize the anthroposophic concepts of pain
  • Summarize concepts of pain in spiritual healing, homeopathy, naturopathy, osteopathy and traditional Chinese medicine

Soft Tissue Injuries 101 Soft Tissue Injury: The Neglected Cause of Musculoskeletal Disorders

  • Explain the anatomy and functionality of healthy soft tissue components
  • Explain the effects of injury on soft tissue
  • Define effects of injured soft tissue on functionality of the spine and extremities
    • Discuss patterns of musculoskeletal relationships of recruiting other structures after injury and their effects on functionality
    • Describe various methods of treatment for dysfunctional soft tissue
    • Explain relationship of injured tissue to its surrounding structures, its effects and treatment
    • Explain compensation and recruitment of healthy tissue to the broader scope of complications and the effective treatment of primary and now secondary effects of injury
      • Describe rehabilitation exercises in relation to proprioception Manipulation 105
      • Chiropractic spinal manipulation and cervicogenic headaches, autonomic output
      • Determine the effect of thoracic spine manipulation on autonomic output to the heart
      • Review criteria for the diagnosis of cervicogenic headaches
      • Describe a clinical assessment for cervicogenic headaches
      • Assess the effects of chiropractic and spinal manipulation on cervicogenic headaches

University of Bridgeport Chiropractic College Soft Tissue Injuries 116, 2013:

  • Describe the kinematics of acceleration/deceleration impact.
    • Defend injury manifestation using Whiplash guidelines and models.
    • Apply current model theories to better understand injury from acceleration/deceleration impact.
    • Explain to the patient the effects on the body during front, rear and side collisions.
    • Educate the patient on variables such as vehicle size and direction and the effects on the human frame during acceleration/deceleration impact.
    • Apply the variables of patient age, gender, size, etc. during acceleration/deceleration impact.
      • Express an understanding of incidence, prevalence, injury and risk factors associated with acceleration/deceleration impact.
      • Describe the normal biomechanics of the cervical spine.
      • Discuss cervical spinal anatomy vulnerable to injury.
      • Define the nature of soft tissue structures; joints, ligaments, muscles, bursa, nerves, blood vessels and fascia.
      • Inform your patients of the symptoms and changes to soft tissue structures after acceleration/deceleration impact.
      • Explain the differences between scleratomal, dermatomal and myofascial pain.
      • Discuss prognosis after acceleration/deceleration impact.
        • Describe the normal biomechanics of the TMJ and associated soft tissue structures.
        • Discuss injury to the TMJ and associated soft tissue structures.
        • Explain the effects of trauma to the soft tissue of the spine, structures of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, hand, hip, knee, ankle and foot after acceleration/deceleration impact.
        • Describe the normal biomechanics of the thoracic spine and rib cage.
        • Describe the normal biomechanics of the lumbopelvic spine.
        • Educate the patient on complicating factors for treatment after acceleration/deceleration impact.
        • Determine the necessity and value of imaging and advanced diagnostic imaging after acceleration/deceleration impact.
        • Perform complete examination of the soft tissue structures of the cervical spine, TMJ, thoracic spine, rib cage, lumbopelvic spine, shoulder, elbow, wrist, hand, hip, knee, ankle and foot after acceleration/deceleration impact.
          • Utilize treatment protocols for soft tissue damage after acceleration/deceleration impact.
          • Perform soft tissue treatments such as strain/counterstrain, postisometric relaxation, postfacilitation stretch, somatic technique, active and myofascial release, exercise and stretch, mobilization, manipulation and modalities.
            • Utilize above mentioned soft tissue techniques to treat the cervical spine, TMJ, thoracic spine, rib cage, lumbopelvic spine, shoulder, elbow, wrist, hand, hip, knee, ankle and foot after acceleration/deceleration impact.
            • Communicate to your patients the late effects of soft tissue injury after acceleration/deceleration impact.

 

PROFESSIONAL PRESENTATIONS

 

  • “The Role of Human, Vehicle and Environmental Factors in Traffic Accident Cases: From Reconstruction through Litigation”, Lawyers & Judges

Publishing Company, Inc. of Tucson, AZ. Seminar presented in Scottsdale, AZ. One hour presentation regarding human factors and chiropractic involvement in accident cases.

 

PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS

 

  • American Chiropractic Association (ACA)
  • Arizona Chiropractic Society (ACS)

 

ORGANIZATIONS

 

  • 1991 to 2004: President and Executive Director, Independent Chiropractic Physicians (ICP)
  • 2004 to Current: President and Executive Director, Arizona Chiropractic Society (ACS), formerly Independent Chiropractic Physicians (ICP)
  • 1992-1993: Volunteer, American Cancer Society
  • 1988-1990: President, Arizona Chiropractic Alliance (AzCA)
  • 1987-1988: Chairman of Insurance Relations, Public Relations and Publications Committees, Chiropractic Association of Arizona (CAA)
  • 1994: Second Vice-President, Arizona Association of Chiropractic (AAC)

 

PUBLICATIONS

 

  • “The Medical and Biomechanical Aspects of Low Speed Accidents,” by Alan M. Immerman, D.C. in Low-Speed Automobile Accidents: Accident Reconstruction and Occupant Kinematics, Dynamics and Biomechanics, Third Edition with videotape. Author: Alan J. Watts Ph.D. Contributors: Patrick Hannon Ed.D., Alan

M. Immerman D.C., Ripley B. Harwood Esq. B.B.A. J.D, Randall H. Kehl J.D., Kerry Knapp, Nicholas E. Vakula Esq., Samantha N. Lapin. Lawyers and Judges Publishing Company, Tucson, Arizona, 2003.

  • MedicoLegal News, a periodic newsletter for lawyers and doctors, 1997 to 2012[AI1] . Some past newsletters posted online at www.AZChiropractors.org.
  • World Review Nutrition and Dietetics, 37:38, 1981,"Vitamin B12 and a Vegetarian Diet"
  • Journal of the American Chiropractic Association: The following literature review articles each contain dozens or hundreds of references to the peer- reviewed scientific literature indexed by the National Library of Medicine:

  1. April, 1979 – “Evidence for Intestinal Toxemia, An Inescapable Clinical Phenomenon”
  2. January, 1980 – “Protein Requirement”
  3. March, 1980 – “Fasting and Diet Restriction in the Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease”
  4. December, 1980 -- “Can Diet Prolong Lifespan”
  5. June, 1981 – “Scientific Basis for the Concept of Toxemia”

(Note: All studies posted at http://www.AZChiropractors.org/pages/important-reports- and-articles.php)

  • Digest of Chiropractic Economics: Articles published in May/June, 1980; September/October, 1980; April, 1987
  • Mesa Tribune: weekly column "Healthful Eating," 1981
  • Health Science Journal, Vegetarian Times Magazine, Bestwavs Magazine, Body Forum Magazine, Total Health Magazine, The American Journal of Clinical Chiropractic, The Chiropractic Journal: many articles in each publication from 1975 to 2000
  • Health Unlimited!, a book published in 1989 by Naturegraph Publishing Company: Full text posted at http://www.AZChiropractors.org/pages/important- reports-and-articles.php
  • AZCA News, the monthly journal of the Arizona Chiropractic Alliance, wrote, edited and published 1988 to 1991; and ICP News, the monthly journal of Independent Chiropractic Physicians, wrote, edited and published 1994 to 2004
  • ACS News, the monthly journal of the Arizona Chiropractic Society, wrote, edited and published from 2004 to present. All past monthly newsletters posted online from January, 1996 to current at http://www.AZChiropractors.org/pages/acs- monthly-newsletters.php.

 


 [AI1]

602-932-8113.